Wednesday, 1 November 2017

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

IT'S HALLOWEEN TIME!!!!!!!!
31st October 2017
If you want to carve a Jack-O-Lantern you have to follow these steps:
First- Take your umbrellas and go to the market to buy 4 pumpkins.




Second- Divide the class in four groups and cover the table with newspaper.
Third- Measure a circle with about a 2-inch (5cm) radius from the stem. You'll cut around this circle to make the lid. 


Fourth- Remove the filling from the pumpkin. Use a large spoon or your hands to pull all of the filling and seeds from the inside of your pumpkin. 










Fifth- Draw your design on the pumpkin. For traditional, silhouette and pith carving, use a permanent marker or dry-erase marker to outline your design on the pumpkin.








Sixth- For pumpkin carving, use a serrated bread knife.



Seventh- Uou!!! Amazing!! Well done Suricates!!













CONGRATULATIONS SURICATES AND THANKS FOR YOUR HELP CARME! 2015!








Frankenweenie (2012) Trailer - Tim Burton 

THIS IS HALLOWEEN BY TIM BURTON!!!


How to make a jack-o-lantern

Can you dress up a monster?
CLICK HERE
Do you want to hear a Halloween story?

A SONG!!! JAJAJAJAJAJAJAJAAJA!!!!!


AND ANOTHER SONG!


I love this picture!!!!

I know you love this game!!!!!!

CLICK HERE
Do you want to play a game???
SPOOKY BLOCK-OUT
In this game, you control a paddle that is used to hit a ball into breakable blocks. You can even pick up special bonus items to help you complete each level. This is a spooky Halloween twist on a classic game.
CLICK HERE!

Do you want to play more games?
HALLOWEEN MATCHING!!
This is a memory matching game with a bit of Halloween style. Memorize the images on the cards before they flip over and then try and find all of the matching pairs of cards before time runs out.


CLICK HERE!!

Sunday, 14 May 2017



PAPA PLEASE GET THE MOON FOR ME!!!

bY ERIC CARLE
SNOWHITE

IPA PRODUCTIONS


Snow White lives in a beautiful palace with Queen Ezmerelda. But one day the Magic Mirror tells the Queen that she is not the best at everything. The Queen gets very angry and Snow White escapes to the forest. There she finds a small, dirty little house inhabited by dwarves…





















Friday, 17 March 2017

HAPPY SAINT PATRICK'S DAY!!!!

EVERYBODY IS IRISH ON MARCH THE 17th
Saint Patrick is the Patron Saint of Ireland.
Do you want to hear and see the Saint Patrick's story narrated by a child??? It's really good!!





Do you want to play games about Saint Patrick's Day???


BUT...Where is Ireland?????
Another game??



And one more!!!!!

Saturday, 11 February 2017

MEG AND MOG




Meg and Mog is a series of children’s books written by Helen Nicoll and illustrated by Jan Pieńkowski. First published in the 1970s, the books are about Meg, a witch whose spells always seem to go wrong, her striped cat Mog, and their friend Owl.
It was also made into an animated comedy series based on the books. Fifty two 5 minute episodes were produced by Absolutely Productions and first broadcast in the UK on CITV in 2003 Tiny Pop. It was produced by Carl Gorham and directed by Roger Mainwood, featuring the voices of Alan Bennett as Owl, Fay Ripley as Meg, Phil Cornwell as Mog.





Do you want to play a game?

http://www.purposegames.com/game/a1fbac75
















Sunday, 21 February 2016

WE ARE GOING ON A BEAR HUNT 25th ANNIVERSARY!!!

A LOVELY BOOK!!!



Description

For brave hunters and bear-lovers, this is the classic chant-aloud by Michael Rosen and Helen Oxenbury in a beautiful 25th-anniversary edition. We're going on a bear hunt. We're going to catch a big one. Will you come too? For a quarter of a century, readers have been swishy-swashying and splash-sploshing through this award-winning favourite. Follow and join in the family's excitement as they wade through the grass, splash through the river and squelch through the mud in search of a bear. What a surprise awaits them in the cave on the other side of the dark forest! It was the winner of the 1989 Smarties Book Prize and highly commended for the Kate Greenaway Medal. This anniversary edition is a jacketed paperback - embellished with gold foil, gold bear logos and a special gold sticker.




The author: Michael Rosen

Michael Rosen is one of the most popular authors of stories and poems for children. His bestselling titles, published by Walker Books, include Little Rabbit Foo Foo, Michael Rosen's Sad Book, This Is Our House, Tiny Little Fly, Dear Mother Goose and its sequel Dear Fairy Godmother. Michael received the Eleanor Farjeon Award in 1997, and was the Children's Laureate from 2007 to 2009. He is a distinguished critic and academic, co-directing an MA in Children's Literature at Birkbeck College. Michael lives in London with his family. 




The illustrator: Helen Oxenbury

Helen Oxenbury is among the most popular and critically acclaimed illustrators of her time. Her numerous books for children include Smarties Book Prize-winning Farmer Duck by Martin Waddell; We're Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen; as well as her classic board books for babies. She won the Kate Greenaway Medal for Alice in Wonderland. Her most recent picture book was the critically acclaimed There's Going to Be a Baby, the first book-publishing collaboration between her and her husband John Bumingham. Helen lives in London, NW3.


Do you want to see the author explaining the book??



The animated version




Good Morning Britain.
Michael Rosen author of 'We're Going On A Bear Hunt' discusses the importance of getting children reading and how to do it.




His website



Thursday, 11 February 2016

GROUNDHOG DAY

Groundhog Day

The Adventures of Punxsutawney Phil, Wiarton Willie,
and Pothole Pete

by Holly Hartman
A groundhog with his shadow

 

February 2 brings the most-watched weather forecast of the year—and the only one led by a rodent. Legend has it that on this morning, if a groundhog can see its shadow, there will be six more weeks of winter. If it cannot see its shadow, spring is on the way.

Why the Groundhog?

Since a groundhog (or woodchuck or "whistle pig") hibernates for the winter, its coming out of the ground is a natural sign of spring. In Europe centuries ago, people watched for other hibernating animals, including badgers, bears, and hedgehogs, as signs of winter's end. Germans who immigrated to Pennsylvania in the mid-1800s began keeping an eye on the groundhog. The widespread population of the rodent made it a handy agent for this particular weather superstition.
And a superstition it is. But there's a grain of truth: the winter days when you can see your shadow clearly are often especially cold, because there are no clouds overhead to insulate the earth.

Why now?

Early February is midway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. Throughout history numerous holidays have marked this seasonal crossroads. Among these is Candlemas Day, February 2, a Christian holiday that celebrates Mary's ritual purification. Early Christians believed that if the sun came out on Candlemas Day, winter would last for six weeks more.
The ancient Romans observed a mid-season festival on February 5, and the pagan Irish celebrated one around February 1. In many parts of Europe early February might herald the start of spring, when crops could be planted.

Punxsutawney Phil and Friends

In the 1880s some friends in Punxsutawney, Penn., went into the woods on Candlemas Day to look for groundhogs. This outing became a tradition, and a local newspaper editor nicknamed the seekers "the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club." Starting in 1887 the search became an official event centered on a groundhog called Punxsutawney Phil. A ceremony still takes place every year.
Today Punxsutawney Phil lives in a climate-controlled habitat adjoining the Punxsutawney Library. A local celebrity, he gained national fame in the 1993 movie Groundhog Day (which was shot in scenic Woodstock, Illinois). The weather-watching rodent's predictions are recorded in the Congressional Records of our National Archive. So far, Phil has seen his shadow about 85% of the time.
Canada's Groundhog Day relies on the predictions of an albino groundhog named Wiarton Willie. Although Punxsutawney Phil gets the most attention, various American cities have their own special groundhogs; New York City's official groundhog is called "Pothole Pete."